At a glance

  • Field of study

    natural and earth science
  • Degree type

    postgraduate
  • Degree

    Master of Science
  • Language of instruction

    English
  • Full/part-time

    full-time, part-time
  • Course start

    summer semester, winter semester
  • Admission restriction

    without admission restriction
  • Standard period of study

    four semesters

  • ECTS credits

    120

Requirements

  • A completed bachelor’s degree in physics;
  • if the applicant holds a degree in a different subject, the examination board will decide on his or her admission to the MSc International Physics Studies Programme (IPSP). Admission is possible if the applicant’s degree is from a course of study which is related or similar in content to a degree in physics;
  • knowledge of English at B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (or equivalent).

The faculty will check whether the above requirements have been met and then issue an official notification. This serves as proof that the candidate meets the relevant admission requirements.

Contents

The M. Sc. Program in physics deepens and widens the basic knowledge in modern areas of experimental and theoretical physics, always founding on the knowledge obtained in a B. Sc. course in Physics. Further, in physical and non-physical subjects the students have the possibility to specialize in topical areas of physics. Students can design their M. Sc. course along their own interests, such that at the time of graduation they are specialists of either experimental physics of soft or solid matter, or theoretical and mathematical physics or applied physics. To this end the Peter-Debye Institute for soft matter physics, the Felix-Bloch-Institute for solid state physics, the Institute of Theoretical Physics as well as the external Leibniz-Institute of Surface Modification offer a wide variety of modules and research topics.

The M. Sc. program is research oriented and is concluded by an independent research project, the master thesis.

By teaching a broad variety of knowledge and methodical competences it ideally prepares the graduates for an excellent start in the job market, which in the future will present great challenges with its rapidly changing demands.

The master course consists of two one year periods or phases, a first phase in which the physics knowledge is deepened and widened, followed by a research phase. In the first phase the education in experimental and theoretical physics is continued and widened. This phase is structured into four areas, with three of these being obligatory by choice, whereas within the fourth area physical and non-physical subjects might be more or less freely chosen.

Area 1 is devoted to experimental physics and gives the student a choice between a course in Advanced Condensed Matter Physics and a course in Soft Matter Physics.

Area 2 is devoted to the advancement of the theoretical physics knowledge with a choice between advanced courses in Quantum Mechanics and Statistical Physics.

Areas 3 and 4 both serve the further specialization. In these areas the module list reflects the research interests of the Physics Institutes as well as the external Institute for Surface Modification. The division into areas 3 and 4 is due to didactical reasons. Area 3 contains a choice of various advanced seminars in experimental and theoretical physics. Besides transporting specific physics knowledge, in the advanced seminars the student learns certain soft skills, such as literature research, presentation techniques, scientific writing and scientific discussion. Area 4 contains modules with various physical content and of various module forms. Within area 4 the student might choose not only from the range of physics subjects, but – to a certain extent – also from general science subjects.

In the research phase the student is doing research work on a topical physics subject under the supervision of a professor or senior scientist. This is done in a series of three steps. The decision on a special topic is followed by a preparatory phase in which the student first studies the physical background, the experimental or computational methods, topical references to research papers and then develops a project outline. This preparatory phase lasts for half a year and is structured in the research seminars I and II. The second half of the research phase is then devoted to the actual scientific work on the specified problem. The research phase is concluded with the submission and defense of the master thesis.

The Master of Science in physics completes the university education and represents the level of the Diploma. The academic degree qualifies to apply for admission for doctoral work (thesis research). Traditional operational areas of physicists are microelectronics, construction of scientific and medical devices, fine mechanics, engineering, optics, chemical industry, informatics and communication technology. Due to their analytic research concepts and problem solving strategies physicists' jobs away from physics are common.

Application

Course start: winter semester and summer semester
Admission restriction (NCU): no
Application period: 2 May–15 September for the winter semester; 1 December–15 March for the summer semester
Application portal: AlmaWeb

International students can find information about application periods and how to apply here.

Options in the winter semester: 2nd semester, 3rd semester and 4th semester – each without restrictions on admission
Options in the summer semester: 2nd semester, 3rd semester and 4th semester – each without restrictions on admission
Application period: 2 May–15 September for the winter semester; 1 December–15 March for the summer semester
Application portal: AlmaWeb
Special enrolment requirements: credits form (Anrechnungsbescheid)

International students can find information about application periods and how to apply here.

Internationality

Compulsory curriculum in English

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