In the summer semester 2020, the majority of courses at our university are being held online. The University’s multimedia and HE teaching and learning specialists are working hard to support you in converting your lectures, seminars and practical classes to digital formats. This page provides support, practical recommendations, guides as well as legal information on the subject of digital teaching.

Junge Frau mit Laptop und Kopfhörern, Foto: Colourbox
Teaching online can work too! Photo: Colourbox

Shifting the Summer Semester Online

To help you get through the summer semester with e-learning, we recommend focusing on guided independent study, with simple solutions that are not taught in real time. To make sure things run as smoothly as possible, it is important to consider a few things beforehand –– what would you like to teach and what resources are available to you?

Generally speaking, we recommend that you:

  • Establish and communicate transparent rules and requirements
  • Shift the focus away from teaching in real time
  • Use real-time teaching sparingly, such as for online office hours.

Our guide to planning the online summer semester and the following initial considerations will help get you started:

  • Learning objectives
    What are the three most important things that students should learn in their “guided independent study” – what knowledge, working techniques, or media skills? What is the focus of the course in question?
  • Examinations
    Which examinations are planned? What about other assessed work? How are the different tasks, set reading and learning outcomes related to this?
  • Target group
    How large is your group of students? What prior knowledge can you assume? To what extent are students familiar with digital formats and working independently? Are the digital tools easily accessible to all students? How mixed is the group likely to be – for example, is the course part of a compulsory elective? What information do you need, and which of that information will you need to obtain when first getting to know the students?
    Our tips for getting to know your students and gauging their abilities will help you here.
  • Your own resources
    How can you prepare and conduct the course well without overcomplicating things for yourself? How willing are you to take risks when it comes to digital formats? How much time do you currently have to prepare? How can you and your colleagues support each other? What hours will you be able to work at the beginning of the semester?

Please contact your students by email as soon as possible to inform them about your course. Depending on the module registration system and established practice in the faculties, you can obtain the contact details of the students who have registered for your course through AlmaWeb or TOOL. If neither of these two options is available to you, or if you have any problems exporting participant lists, please contact your Study Office.

Coronavirus website for students

Students can find the latest information about the online semester on the CORONAVIRUS INFORMATION PAGE.

  1. You provide learning material by email or in the “Speicherwolke” file hosting service as early as possible. This might be texts, bibliographies, lists of links, or perhaps PowerPoint presentations with or without an audio track.
    Keep the amount of material to a minimum; limit yourself to what you want to achieve in the first few weeks.
  2. You won’t be able to answer a student’s question in real time. Come up with clear and specific assignments – for example, key questions, problems or similar. Students in lower semesters will probably require more detailed instructions.
  3. In order to get an impression of how your students are coping with the assignments they have been given, decide on a form of response – such as texts, pictures or certificates – and a particular communication channel (email or upload to the “Speicherwolke”). Make sure that this channel is available to all of the students. If necessary, ask them first.
    TIP: Clearly specify the required form (number of characters, file format, etc.) and remember to set a deadline!
  4. Let your students know how and by when they will receive feedback from you about their results.
  5. Inform students when and how they can contact you with questions and problems, either by email or phone.
    TIP: Make it clear when you can be contacted.
  6. Inform your students about how the course will be run, how they will be expected to work, and how they will be examined. Make it absolutely clear how the results of this first phase of independent study will affect how the students are examined overall.
    TIP: The more students understand the reason why they are doing something, the more motivated they will be.
  7. If you want the students in your course to work together in pairs or groups, arrange an introductory phase (e.g. with students submitting a brief description of themselves) and then decide who should work with whom.
    TIP: To get a first impression yourself, get the students to give you some sort of initial response. For example, use a quiz or short questionnaire to find out about the students’’ previous knowledge or interests.
  8. Using email can be quite awkward with large groups of students. In such cases, we recommend that you use a Moodle course to help structure communication with your students.

You can imagine the Moodle learning platform as a virtual classroom. In it you can store teaching material, interact with students, and do virtual group work. Moodle lets you communicate with large groups of students without getting inundated with emails. The Lehre.digital Hilfekurs is an introductory course providing an overview of what you can do on Moodle. All you need is your university login.

If it’s your first time creating a course, take a look at our short guide. The Lehre.digital forum is a space for you to swap notes with other lecturers and people from the University’s e-learning team.

Please note the following when using Moodle:

  1. Use the Moodle course to provide learning material weekly and in blocks. This might be texts, bibliographies, lists of links, or perhaps PowerPoint presentations with or without an audio track. Keep the amount of material to a minimum; limit yourself to what you want to achieve in the first few weeks.
  2. You won’t be able to answer a student’s question in real time. Come up with clear and specific assignments – for example, key questions, problems or similar. Students in lower semesters will probably require more detailed instructions.
  3. In order to get an impression of how your students are coping with the assignments they have been given, decide on a form of response – such as texts, pictures or certificates – and a particular communication channel (e.g. file upload to a directory of forum in Moodle). 
    TIP: Clearly specify the required form (number of characters, file format, etc.) and remember to set a deadline!
  4. Let your students know how and by when they will receive feedback from you about their results. A forum is provided for staggered communication between the lecturer and students but also between students themselves.
  5. Participants of a Moodle course can message each other, offering a means of sharing information.
    TIP: Tell your students the times when you will respond to their requests.
  6. Inform your students about how the course will be run, how they will be expected to work, and how they will be examined. Make it absolutely clear how the results of this first phase of independent study will affect how the students are examined overall.
    TIP: The more students understand the reason why they are doing something, the more motivated they will be.
  7. If the students in your course are supposed to work together in pairs or small groups, it is possible to create forums for the individual groups. There you as the lecturer can accompany students as they get to know each other.

We advise you to focus on formats that do not involve teaching in real time. Otherwise, you may find that the network is overloaded and experience poor connections. Due to current circumstances, students may not be able to participate in video conferences.

Resources for the Online Summer Semester

There are a variety of digital teaching formats available to help you teach online this summer semester. Before deciding on a particular format, please make sure that it is accessible to all your students.

You can find further inspiration in the “Lehre.digital” Moodle course.

Beispielfilm: Eine Präsentation aufzeichnen

The Centre for Media and Communication (ZMK) can produce video recordings and live streams for you

Leipzig University’s Centre for Media and Communication (ZMK) offers video recordings and live streams for teaching staff. If you are interested, please contact Mr Meier.

Video conferencing software

You can find current information about video conferencing software on the University Computing Centre (URZ) website.

Live chats

The University Computing Centre has made the open-source chat software Rocket.Chat available to all University members. To register, all you need is your university login. It is recommended for a variety of uses including:

  •         Offering consultations and virtual office hours
  •         Working in small groups (for students)
  •         Interest-based and low-threshold communication
  •         Publicly collecting questions and answers.

Ensure access for all students

If you use live streams or video conferencing software, make sure that you also enable students who cannot attend the course (due to care obligations, a poor or unstable internet connection, work commitments, lack of technical equipment, disabilities) to access the material being taught. Keep the use of parallel written chats to a minimum, as these may not be equally accessible to everyone and may distract from the topic.

You can facilitate access as follows, for example:

  • Lectures: Record your live stream and then use Opencast to embed the video on Moodle. The E-Learning Service team can assist you. At the beginning of the lecture, point out that it is being recorded. If possible, make presentations available in advance so that students can prepare and follow the content of your lecture more easily.
  • Seminars and practical exercises: At the beginning of the first session, check whether all students are able to participate in live sessions. If not all students can participate, offer alternative ways for them to receive the material being taught.

Tutorials will also start digitally via Moodle this summer semester. Since they are not usually listed in the TOOL or AlmaWeb portals, most tutors will find that they are unable to contact their students. You as a lecturer you can support tutors:

  • Inform students about dedicated Moodle courses for the tutorials (course name, registration key)

    or
  • Set aside an area in your Moodle course for the accompanying tutorial, which tutors can then use themselves. To do this, assign the tutor the role “SHK” in the Moodle course.

Since the University Library is currently closed, you and your students cannot borrow printed media. You can use digital media for the start of the online semester. The University Library offers various digital resources for this purpose:

  • ​Temporary licences for research and teaching
  • Free e-resources on COVID-19
  • Relevant online literature by subject.

University Library e-resources

Faculty of Medicine

The Faculty of Medicine offers lecturers information on video production, freely available software and interactive digital tools as well as instructions for the Faculty’s student portal.

FACULTY OF MEDICINE RESOURCES

Frequently Asked Questions

General Information

Wie empfehlenswert ist es, Lehrveranstaltungen per Videokonferenz durchzuführen?

Sie als Lehrende können nach eigenem Ermessen entscheiden, welche Lehrformate und welche der vom Universitätsrechenzentrum (URZ) zur Verfügung gestellten digitalen Werkzeuge zur Unterstützung der jeweiligen Lehrveranstaltung Sie wählen. Bitte beachten Sie dabei:

  • Videokonferenzen ermöglichen eine direkte Kommunikation und Austausch zwischen Ihnen und Ihren Studierenden sowie den Studierenden untereinander. Sie eignen sich daher beispielsweise für Feedback-Runden oder Sprechstunden. Die Verwendung von Headsets verbessert die Audio-Qualität.

  • Für störungsfreie Videokonferenzen ist eine stabile Internetverbindung aller Beteiligten unerlässlich. Das URZ beobachtet die Auslastung und vergrößert die technischen Ressourcen im Rahmen der Möglichkeiten. Ein sparsamer Umgang mit Datenmengen ist deshalb im Interesse aller Beteiligten.

Wir empfehlen Ihnen vor allem auf zeitversetzte Lösungen im Sinne eines angeleiteten Selbststudiums zu setzen. Dafür können Sie zum Beispiel vertonte PowerPoint-Präsentationen nutzen.

Welche Videokonferenz-Systeme kann ich in der Lehre nutzen?

Das URZ ermöglicht die Nutzung der Videokonferenz-Systems „BigBlueButton“ für Lehrveranstaltungen.

BigBlueButton (BBB) wird auf Servern unserer Universität betrieben. Wir empfehlen Ihnen die Nutzung über Ihren Kurs in Moodle. Sie können dazu als Trainer in Ihrem Moodle-Kurs die Aktivität wie folgt wählen:

  1. „Bearbeiten einschalten“
  2. Aktivität oder Material hinzufügen
  3. „BigBlueButton“ auswählen
  4. „Hinzufügen“

Bei Fragen dazu können Sie eine Mail an videokonferenz[at]uni-leipzig.de schreiben. Weiterführende Informationen erhalten Sie im Moodlekurs: Lehre.digital.

Weitere Informationen erhalten Sie auf den Seiten des Universitätsrechenzentrums.

Legal Information

Benötige ich das Einverständnis der Studierenden, wenn ich mit ihnen in einer Videokonferenz, also im Livestream, arbeiten will? Wenn ja, reicht eine mündliche Abfrage? Wie verhält es sich, wenn ich die Veranstaltung zudem aufzeichnen möchte?

  • Insofern es sich lediglich um eine Videokonferenz im Livestream handelt, wird keine gesonderte Einverständniserklärung von den Studierenden benötigt
  • Wenn die Veranstaltung zudem aufgezeichnet wird, muss klar sein, wofür die Aufzeichnung verwendet wird. Unabhängig davon, ob Studierende mit Bild (Video) und Ton (Audio) oder nur Ton an einer Lehrveranstaltung teilnehmen und dort beispielweise miteinander diskutieren sollen, wird vorab eine Einverständniserklärung benötigt
  • Laut Datenschutzgrundverordnung (DSGVO) ist eine elektronische Zustimmung zulässig. Die kann beim Zugang zur Videokonferenz abgefragt werden. Zu beachten ist, dass die Zustimmung für jede Veranstaltung einzuholen ist und später einsehbar sein sollte. Studierende können zum Beispiel ihre Zustimmung geben, dass die Aufzeichnung von Kommilitoninnen und Kommilitonen in Moodle gesehen, aber nicht frei verfügbar ins Internet gestellt werden darf
  • Auch hier gilt das Prinzip der Datensparsamkeit sowie das Recht der Studierenden am eigenen Bild und am gesprochenen Wort

Was muss ich beachten, wenn ich Bilder, Texte und Filme in meiner Lehre nutzen, weitergeben, kopieren oder im Internet bzw. in Moodle veröffentlichen möchte?

  • Sie können einen Link auf Texte, Bilder, Videos, Musik- oder Tonaufzeichnungen (Audiodateien) im Internet setzen
  • Sie können Video- & Audiodateien, Texte & Bilder als Zitate nutzen
  • Denken Sie dabei jeweils an die Angabe der Quelle(n)
  • Beachten Sie weiterhin, dass Sie Dienste nutzen, die frei zugänglich und datensparsam sind
  • Für eine Verwendung außerhalb der Lehrveranstaltung benötigen Sie das entsprechende schriftliche Einverständnis des Rechteinhabers oder der Rechteinhaberin

Wie kennzeichne ich Bilder, Texte und Filme, die unter Creative Common Lizenzen stehen?

  • Auch bei der Verwendung sogenannter Creative Commons (CC Lizenzen) für Videos, Musik, Texte und Bilder muss die Quelle gut sichtbar angegeben sein.
  • Informieren Sie sich darüber, unter welchen Bedingungen fremdes Material genutzt werden kann (Namens- und Lizenznennung)
  • Besuchen Sie den Moodle-Kurs Open Eductional Ressources um ausführlichere Informationen zu erhalten

Was sagt das Urheberrecht (§60 UrhG) zur Online-Bereitstellung von Materialien?

Am 1. März 2018 trat das Gesetz zur Angleichung des Urheberrechts an die aktuellen Erfordernisse der Wissensgesellschaft in Kraft. Durch dieses werden die § 60a-h des Urheberrechtsgesetzes (UrhG) neu geregelt, die sich mit der Nutzung geschützter Werke in Bildung und Wissenschaft befassen. Eine Sammlung von Informationen, auch in Englisch, finden Sie im Moodle-Kurs Digitale Semesterapparate.

Für die Teilnehmenden einer Lehrveranstaltung gilt:

  • Von umfangreichen Schriftwerken (Monographien, Lehrwerke etc.) dürfen Audio- und Videodateien über 5 Minuten Länge maximal 15 % des Gesamttextes zugänglich gemacht werden, zum Beispiel indem sie digitalisiert und zum Download angeboten oder kopiert werden
  • Werke geringeren Umfangs (bis 25 Seiten), also zum Beispiel Zeitschriften- oder Lexikonartikel, können vollständig genutzt werden. Gleiches gilt für Audio- und Videodateien bis 5 Minuten Länge
  • Vergriffene Werke, die seit 2 Jahren nicht mehr erhältlich sind, dürfen vollumfänglich genutzt werden
  • Werke unter der CC-Lizenz können vollumfänglich genutzt werden. Darunter fallen z.B. Open Educational Resources. Weitere Informationen finden Sie dazu im Moodle-Kurs: Open Educational Ressources
  • Gesetzestexte, Urteile, Veröffentlichungen von Behörden und Öffentlichen Einrichtungen dürfen vollständig genutzt werden
  • Elektronische Zeitschriften und Bücher, die die Universität Leipzig über die Universitätsbibliothek lizensiert hat dürfen ebenfalls verwendet werden

Was kann ich bei der Bereitstellung eigener Materialien für Andere beachten?

Wenn Sie beispielsweise ein eigenes Video, ein Bild, einen Podcast oder einen Text erstellt haben, können Sie diese mit einer Creative Commons Lizenz (CC-Lizenz) veröffentlichen:

  • Mit Hilfe so genannter CC-Lizenzen können Sie anderen standardisierte Nutzungsrechte an Ihrem Werk einräumen
  • Die entsprechende Lizenzierung können Sie entsprechend in Ihrem Werk einfügen
  • Weitere Informationen, zum Beispiel zu den einzelnen Lizensierungen, erhalten Sie auf der Webseite „CreativeCommons“ oder im Moodle-Kurs Open Eductional Ressources

You may also like

Teaching and Research

Read more

Welcome Center

Read more

Teaching abroad

Read more